Wikipedia
Search Wikipedia:

Latest topics
» Making air, pollution free
Today at 1:27 am by bejoy

» Industry 4.0 to push for advanced manufacturing – Analysis
Yesterday at 12:18 am by bejoy

» New boron nitride foam soaks up carbon dioxide
Mon Aug 21, 2017 2:07 am by bejoy

» Plutonium & Its Important Facts
Mon Aug 21, 2017 2:05 am by bejoy

» The Best Kept Secrets About Krypton
Sat Aug 19, 2017 1:50 am by bejoy

» Researchers develop new tough, self-healing rubber
Fri Aug 18, 2017 2:26 am by bejoy

» The Ultimate Guide Copper Sulphate
Fri Aug 18, 2017 2:24 am by bejoy

» An Introduction Tin Element(Sn)
Thu Aug 17, 2017 4:28 am by bejoy

» Rarely Known Facts Stainless Steel
Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:50 am by bejoy

August 2017
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031   

Calendar Calendar

Free Hit Counter

Volume occupied by a gas?

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Volume occupied by a gas?

Post  humblemetsuke on Thu Feb 26, 2015 1:01 pm

Which of the following has the largest volume
under the same conditions of temperature and
pressure?
A 1 g hydrogen
B 14 g nitrogen
C 20·2 g neon
D 35·5 g chlorine

I thought that the volume of a mole of gas (AKA Molar Volume) was equal, for ALL gases; at the same temperature and pressure (which according to this question is the case).

I used m/gfm; and I identified that they all have one mole. However, the answer states that the answer is C; Neon is the gas with the largest volume. The only thing I think of here in this case; is that Neon is the only Monatomic gas; where the others are diatomic; so what, the values are halved...?

humblemetsuke

Posts : 2
Join date : 2015-02-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Volume occupied by a gas?

Post  DrPelezo on Fri May 22, 2015 5:15 pm

I'm with you on this one. The classic definition of molar volume is the volume occupied by 1.000 mole of ANY gas at specified temperature-pressure conditions. Just because a gas is monatomic vs diatomic does not exempt it from this definition. Using the ideal gas law equation and solving for Volume, shows that for 1-mole of any gas at a specified Kelvin Temp (say 273-K) and 1.00-Atm pressure, V[sub]m[sub] = 22.4-L for any gas chosen. The only variables that would affect this are temperature and pressure values.

Whoever posted this question needs to provide more information to justify answer choice 'C', or edit the answer choices to include an E-choice, 'all have the same volume'. Doc

DrPelezo

Posts : 13
Join date : 2015-05-17
Age : 68
Location : Houston, TX - USA

View user profile http://www.chemunlimited.com

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum