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Volume occupied by a gas?

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Volume occupied by a gas?

Post  humblemetsuke on Thu Feb 26, 2015 1:01 pm

Which of the following has the largest volume
under the same conditions of temperature and
pressure?
A 1 g hydrogen
B 14 g nitrogen
C 20·2 g neon
D 35·5 g chlorine

I thought that the volume of a mole of gas (AKA Molar Volume) was equal, for ALL gases; at the same temperature and pressure (which according to this question is the case).

I used m/gfm; and I identified that they all have one mole. However, the answer states that the answer is C; Neon is the gas with the largest volume. The only thing I think of here in this case; is that Neon is the only Monatomic gas; where the others are diatomic; so what, the values are halved...?

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Re: Volume occupied by a gas?

Post  DrPelezo on Fri May 22, 2015 5:15 pm

I'm with you on this one. The classic definition of molar volume is the volume occupied by 1.000 mole of ANY gas at specified temperature-pressure conditions. Just because a gas is monatomic vs diatomic does not exempt it from this definition. Using the ideal gas law equation and solving for Volume, shows that for 1-mole of any gas at a specified Kelvin Temp (say 273-K) and 1.00-Atm pressure, V[sub]m[sub] = 22.4-L for any gas chosen. The only variables that would affect this are temperature and pressure values.

Whoever posted this question needs to provide more information to justify answer choice 'C', or edit the answer choices to include an E-choice, 'all have the same volume'. Doc

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