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Chemicals found in plastics linked to chronic disease in men: Study

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Chemicals found in plastics linked to chronic disease in men: Study

Post  bejoy on Tue Jul 18, 2017 1:53 am

Researchers from the University of Adelaide and the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) have found that chemicals in everyday plastics are linked to cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and high blood pressure in men.
The researchers investigated the independent association between chronic diseases among men and concentrations of potentially harmful chemicals known as phthalates.
The results of the study is published in the journal Environmental Research.
Phthalates are a group of chemicals widely used in common consumer products, such as food packaging and wrappings, toys, medications, and even medical devices.
Researchers found that of the 1500 South Australian men tested, phthalates were detected in urine samples of 99.6 percent of those aged 35 and over.
"We found that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and high blood pressure increased among those men with higher total phthalate levels," said senior author associate professor Zumin Shi, from the University of Adelaide and a member of SAHMRI's nutrition & metabolism theme.

"While we still don't understand the exact reasons why phthalates are independently linked to disease, we do know the chemicals impact on the human endocrine system, which controls hormone release that regulates the body’s growth, metabolism, and sexual development and function.
Read more: https://goo.gl/TSq8U3

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